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Are health services accessible for people who are deaf or have hearing loss?

Section: The ALLIANCEType: News Item Date Published: 23rd November 2017

Survey seeks views on whether health services are doing enough to meet accessibility needs.

ALLIANCE members Action on Hearing Loss Scotland have produced a survey to gather information about the experiences and views of people who are deaf or have hearing loss about the accessibility of hospitals, health centres and GP surgeries.

Under the Equality Act 2010, people have the right to expect reasonable adjustments to be made if they face substantial difficulties accessing NHS services due to their deafness or hearing loss. This includes people who are Deaf or have a hearing loss.

For example, some people find it difficult or impossible to use the telephone and may need to contact their hospital, health centre or GP in other ways. Others may need a British Sign Language (BSL) interpreter or an Electronic Notetaker in order to follow medical advice being verbally given to them.

In June 2017 the Scottish Government introduced new Health and Social Care Standards which aim to make it easier for people who are Deaf or have hearing loss to access healthcare.

Action on Hearing Loss Scotland now want to find out from people who are Deaf or have hearing loss across Scotland about their experiences when attending appointments at their local hospitals, health centres and GPs during the last 12 months.

To find out how to get involved in the online survey, visit the Action on Hearing Loss Scotland website.

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