The long term outcomes the Programme aims to contribute to and areas we can influence either directly or indirectly.

Our Outcomes

The long term outcomes the Programme seeks to contribute to is ‘the third sector is better able to contribute to and influence health and social care thinking, discussions and decision making at a local and national level’ and has been designed around a theory of change that is rooted in a series of interlinked hypotheses related to achieving this. These are: –

  1. If the sector has a clear and current understanding of the context and landscape, and has the means to consider and reflect on these, it will be better able to: contribute strategically; identify and explore opportunities for improving outcomes through collaborative service delivery; and individual third sector organisations will be better able to proactively evolve their own services to maximise their contribution to outcomes.
  2. The sector will freely share its experience, knowledge and expertise if it is aware of how this contributes to improving outcomes and has the means and capacity to share.
  3. If those who advocate for the sector’s interests have access to appropriate information, training and support, and are well-connected to the sector (both organisations operating locally and those with specialist expertise who do not), they are more confident and competent, and better able to influence strategic discussions

The outcome chains developed using these provided seven short term outcomes that the Programme could directly influence (and assess its impact against) and five medium term outcomes that it could contribute to.

We believe we can directly influence:

  1. More evidence informed information about how to create an environment that enables and maximises the third sector’s contribution to health and wellbeing is available
  2. Participating third sector organisations have easy access to information about the health and social care landscape, and its associated third sector networks.
  3. Participating third sector organisations have increased knowledge and understanding of integration related policy and practice
  4. Participating third sector organisations can navigate the system more effectively
  5. Participating third sector organisationsare more connected to one another and to others with expertise
  6. Participating third sector organisations are better equipped to exert strategic influence
  7. Participating third sector organisations have structured opportunities to work together to develop a collective voice

We believe that it is logical to presume that achieving these will contribute to:

  1. The primary stakeholders in health and social care integration, including Health and Social Care Partnerships, the Scottish Government and the third sector, better understand how to create an environment that enables and maximises the third sector’s contribution to health and wellbeing
  2. Health and social care partnership structures, processes and practices enable and maximise the third sector’s contribution to health and wellbeing
  3. The third sector has a clear and current understanding of the integration landscape and how to navigate it
  4. The third sector has better knowledge & understanding of integration related policy, learning and emergent good practice
  5. The third sector can effectively contribute to the strategic commissioning process and this is valued and recognised
  6. Those who advocate for the sector in strategic forums have the knowledge, skills and connections they need to effectively contribute to and influence health and social care discussions
  7. The sector’s strategic engagement and influence is better coordinated