"I can’t undo things that have happened in my life.  But being identified let me understand how dyslexia affects me"

“I wasn’t identified with dyslexia until middle age.  By then I’d had a lot of negative experiences as a result of unaddressed dyslexia.  My self-esteem suffered badly.

I can’t undo things that have happened in my life.  But being identified let me understand how dyslexia affects me, and start to address my difficulties and use my strengths.  Since then, my life has become much more manageable.

This is partly due to some wonderful support from organisations and individuals that I’ve received, and am continuing to receive.  I feel extremely grateful for this. It has let me grow positively from a very shoogly place.  It is helping me to keep progressing towards being all I can be.

It’s taken me years to find ways to self-manage the practical aspects of my dyslexia, like engaging with books.  It has often felt like doing a Masters degree.  But I’ve been able to take it at my own pace, which has made it achievable for me.

By contrast, when I realised recently that my interpersonal skills were holding me back, I felt lost at sea.

But then I found some guidance by specialists on adult dyslexia on social skills, emotions and attitudes.  It suggested activities I can do to improve in those areas.  I am working through these activities with an advisor who works for an organisation that supports disabled people into employment.

I’m now aware that relating to others is more of a challenge for me than it is for other people.  I understand why it’s difficult, and in which ways.  And I know what I need to do to get better at it.

Having the support I need makes all the difference.”

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