News

ALISS Review of 2018

Section: DigitalType: News Item Date Published: 7th January 2019

Our ALISS team review activities over 2018 for our annual report.

Communities

Our main principle in the delivery of ALISS is that communities and the people who live in those communities are the best people to know what keep them well. This shapes our technology and it shapes our community engagement work. We’ve delivered ALISS Community Roadshows in Grampian and Highland, where we work with partners to raise awareness of ALISS and ask communities’ “what keeps them well?”. Further roadshows will be held across other areas in the coming year. In addition, we’ve delivered ALISS Editor training sessions in a number of locations throughout Scotland to enable and support people to add, manage and share information about the range of services and community assets that exist in their local areas. The input and feedback we obtained, shaped the type of information that was added to ALISS, and it this coproduction approach that ensures ALISS delivers relevant and worthwhile information.

Partnerships

We continue to work with a range of partners to ensure wide access to the information held within ALISS. We’re working in partnership with NHS 24 and Macmillan Cancer Support to support people across Scotland who are working in health and social care and across other area of the public, private and third sectors. We’re working with NHS Health Scotland to support physical activity signposting within the National Physical activity Pathway.

Technical work

This year we launched our main website, our Application Programming Interface (API) and our Plugin; different types of technology that supports people to find and share great health and wellbeing services and activities across Scotland. This technology supports the principle of create once and publish everywhere (COPE), where organisations and service can add their service and activity information once to ALISS and then they can get that information back, in a way that suites them. Saving staff time in adding information to multiple systems, saving money by reducing the need for costly technical systems and reducing the need for multiple directories. Most importantly, it gives people in communities the best opportunity to find information to help them live well.

We thought you might also like: